flodiesel

vorchata asked: Serg, I graduate from college next week and I'm terrified. Do you have any advice for making the transition to the full on adult world?

sergeantd:

Push yourself as hard as you think you can go, then push yourself at least 50% harder than that. Keep it up every single day and never let up. Time fucking FLIES, so you better make the most of it.

Your 20s are tough, because you are going to be working really hard without making very much money. But trust me that it WILL pay off if you do what you’re supposed to do.

One day when you’re like 28 you’ll compare yourself to your friends who “took a break” and wasted half of their 20s partying, playing in shitty hopeless bands, etc instead of hustling. They’ll be sweating wondering how the fuck they’re going to get their career going and make some money, while you’ll be starting to reap the rewards of all those years of hard work.

I’ve seen it happen a million times. Just keep your eye on the prize, work hard every day and things will come out OK. Don’t waste a single day because you can never get it back and you WILL regret it if you do.

theanti90smovement:

becomming:

xlizardx:

Apparently this is "The clearest photo of Mercury ever taken."

why isnt everyone getting so excited about this, it is literally another planet look at how beautiful it is stop what your doing and look at how alien like this planet is what is living there oh my god mercury


put it back in the dumpster where it belongs fucking garbage planet

theanti90smovement:

becomming:

xlizardx:

Apparently this is "The clearest photo of Mercury ever taken."

why isnt everyone getting so excited about this, it is literally another planet look at how beautiful it is stop what your doing and look at how alien like this planet is what is living there oh my god mercury

put it back in the dumpster where it belongs fucking garbage planet

(via wallyedge)

ngadventure:

Extreme Photo of the Week: Backcountry Skiing Squaw Valley
"I better stomp this!" This was on the mind of freeskier JT Holmes before he launched off the "Drifter," a 35-foot cliff in Squaw Valley’s Silverado Canyon, during a shoot for the upcoming Warren Miller film, Like There’s No Tomorrow. Holmes has been doing such stunts for ski flicks since he was 15 years old. "The Drifter offers a clear view from takeoff to landing—if you stop above it. But I was skiing for film and for fun, so I came in nonstop, blind," recalls Holmes, who grew up and still lives in Squaw Valley. "I was psyched. I had just become airborne to find that my trajectory was good, and my vision of the landing was only partly obscured by the falling snow." Even after seeking out the world’s best backcountry, Holmes says nowhere compares to his home turf. “Squaw Valley offers the best skiing experience and community. The layout creates a great vibe on the mountain …” Holmes says. “On top of that, we tend to enjoy mild temperatures. I am not so keen on skiing when it is cold outside.”Getting the Shot"When I get the call on the radio that he is ready, I’ve got about ten seconds before JT drops into the line," says photographer Alex O’Brien. "This is the point when I take a deep breath and steady myself." To get this shot, O’Brien was positioned directly across a small valley at the same elevation as the cliff, which gave him a good perspective. It also showed where Holmes was coming from and where he was headed, which is something O’Brien always tries to communicate in action photos. He chose a Nikon d700 handheld with a 70-200mm lens for the conditions: "I use this lightweight setup when I am shooting a subject that requires me to cover a lot of ground in a day."

ngadventure:

Extreme Photo of the Week: Backcountry Skiing Squaw Valley

"I better stomp this!" This was on the mind of freeskier JT Holmes before he launched off the "Drifter," a 35-foot cliff in Squaw Valley’s Silverado Canyon, during a shoot for the upcoming Warren Miller film, Like There’s No Tomorrow. Holmes has been doing such stunts for ski flicks since he was 15 years old. "The Drifter offers a clear view from takeoff to landing—if you stop above it. But I was skiing for film and for fun, so I came in nonstop, blind," recalls Holmes, who grew up and still lives in Squaw Valley. "I was psyched. I had just become airborne to find that my trajectory was good, and my vision of the landing was only partly obscured by the falling snow."

Even after seeking out the world’s best backcountry, Holmes says nowhere compares to his home turf. “Squaw Valley offers the best skiing experience and community. The layout creates a great vibe on the mountain …” Holmes says. “On top of that, we tend to enjoy mild temperatures. I am not so keen on skiing when it is cold outside.”

Getting the Shot
"When I get the call on the radio that he is ready, I’ve got about ten seconds before JT drops into the line," says photographer Alex O’Brien. "This is the point when I take a deep breath and steady myself." To get this shot, O’Brien was positioned directly across a small valley at the same elevation as the cliff, which gave him a good perspective. It also showed where Holmes was coming from and where he was headed, which is something O’Brien always tries to communicate in action photos. He chose a Nikon d700 handheld with a 70-200mm lens for the conditions: "I use this lightweight setup when I am shooting a subject that requires me to cover a lot of ground in a day."

bayareahardcore:

The new definition of “youth crew”. Fifteen year old on guest vocals (during step aside), passing the mic to PMA kid. Guess which song they covered? 7 seconds, “young till I die”

bayareahardcore:

The new definition of “youth crew”. Fifteen year old on guest vocals (during step aside), passing the mic to PMA kid. Guess which song they covered?

7 seconds, “young till I die”